Use this page to find actions that your household has completed or plans to complete. Browse the categories on the left to find actions for the Power Saver, Green Leader, or Renewable Star Challenge.

Once you have signed in, you can click Add to My Challenge to add an action to your To Do List, Already Completed to mark an action as complete, or Not Applicable if the action does not apply to you.

Once signed in, you can rate each of the actions you have completed.
The highest rated action appear under the Most Popular Actions category.

ACTIONS

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    Green leaves denote the number of Green Points earned by completing the action and its relative environmental benefit.
    Hammers denote the relative amount of effort needed to implement the action.
    Dollar signs denote the relative cost of implementing the action.
    Free < $100
    $100-$500 $501-$2000
    > $2000
    A key denotes a renter-friendly action.
    Dispose of cooking grease properly
    You need to be signed in to add and complete actions.
    Add to my challenge Already completed Not applicable

    Instead of pouring your grease down the drain, collect it in a glass or metal container. Use caution as grease can be very hot. This method of cleaning your pots and pans prevents grease from clogging your pipes and lessens the load on the wastewater system. When the container is full, throw it away or scoop out the solid grease and recycle the container. You can even use leftover animal fat for seasoning cast iron pots or for cooking, as a replacement for butter.

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  • 1
    Green leaves denote the number of Green Points earned by completing the action and its relative environmental benefit.
    Hammers denote the relative amount of effort needed to implement the action.
    Dollar signs denote the relative cost of implementing the action.
    Free < $100
    $100-$500 $501-$2000
    > $2000
    A key denotes a renter-friendly action.
    Use wrapping paper alternatives
    You need to be signed in to add and complete actions.
    Add to my challenge Already completed Not applicable

    Alternatives to wrapping paper include the Sunday comics, reused tin boxes, a reusable canvas bag, or a handkerchief. The Japanese furoshiki is a popular wrapping cloth that is frequently used in Eastern Asia to decorate presents. Reusable baking dishes and flower pots are also eco-forward alternatives to traditional gift-wrapping. Check out some more creative ideas for wrapping paper alternatives.

    May 01 Susan Kraus

    I use the Sunday color 'funnies' to wrap up my gifts! I also recycle holiday cards by making them into gift card tags.

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  • 1
    Green leaves denote the number of Green Points earned by completing the action and its relative environmental benefit.
    Hammers denote the relative amount of effort needed to implement the action.
    Dollar signs denote the relative cost of implementing the action.
    Free < $100
    $100-$500 $501-$2000
    > $2000
    A key denotes a renter-friendly action.
    Reduce paper mail by using a junk mail opt-out service
    You need to be signed in to add and complete actions.
    Add to my challenge Already completed Not applicable

    To reduce your junk mail, follow this guide to reducing junk mail, or try a junk mail opt-out service such as DirectMail.com, 41pounds.org, or Catalog Choice. Call 1-888-5-OPT-OUT or visit OptOutPrescreen.com to reduce unwanted credit card and insurance mailings.

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  • 1
    Green leaves denote the number of Green Points earned by completing the action and its relative environmental benefit.
    Hammers denote the relative amount of effort needed to implement the action.
    Dollar signs denote the relative cost of implementing the action.
    Free < $100
    $100-$500 $501-$2000
    > $2000
    A key denotes a renter-friendly action.
    Dispose of cigarette butts properly, if applicable
    You need to be signed in to add and complete actions.
    Add to my challenge Already completed Not applicable

    A cigarette butt may seem like a small piece of waste, but throwing it on the ground can do a lot of damage. Instead, dispose of it in a cigarette waste receptacle or trash can.

    Cigarette filters are made of a fibrous material called cellulose acetate that takes many years to decompose. Cigarettes that are flicked on the ground or flushed down a drain pollute our local waterways and are eventually carried to the Chesapeake Bay by storm drains and wastewater systems. This “marine debris” is harmful to many plants and animals in the environment. According to the Ocean Conservancy’s annual International Coastal Cleanup reports, cigarette butts are the most common form of ocean debris. According to Clean Virginia Waterways, cigarette filters, cigar tips, and tobacco packaging account for 38% of the marine debris collected worldwide.

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  • 1
    Green leaves denote the number of Green Points earned by completing the action and its relative environmental benefit.
    Hammers denote the relative amount of effort needed to implement the action. Hammers denote the relative amount of effort needed to implement the action.
    Dollar signs denote the relative cost of implementing the action.
    Free < $100
    $100-$500 $501-$2000
    > $2000
    A key denotes a renter-friendly action.
    Use cloth, hybrid, organic, or chlorine-free diapers or feminine products
    You need to be signed in to add and complete actions.
    Add to my challenge Already completed Not applicable

    Approximately 27.4 billion disposable diapers are thrown away in the United States each year, and the average woman disposes of 300 lbs of feminine products in a lifetime. Disposable diapers and feminine products contain toxic materials that endanger consumers and the environment. Learn more about the impacts of disposable diapers and impacts of disposable feminine products.

    Cloth products are the most environmentally-friendly, as they can be washed and reused. If you prefer a disposable product, consider using hybrid or bleach-free disposable diapers or organic feminine products. Hybrid diapers are cloth exteriors with a disposable liner. Read more about the pros and cons of diaper choices and feminine product choices.

    Apr 23 Stephanie Van

    Instead of normal feminine products, I have Thinx

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