Use this page to find actions that your household has completed or plans to complete. Browse the categories on the left to find actions for the Power Saver, Green Leader, or Renewable Star Challenge.

Once you have signed in, you can click Add to My Challenge to add an action to your To Do List, Already Completed to mark an action as complete, or Not Applicable if the action does not apply to you.

Once signed in, you can rate each of the actions you have completed.
The highest rated action appear under the Most Popular Actions category.

ACTIONS

  • 8
    Green leaves denote the number of Green Points earned by completing the action and its relative environmental benefit.
    Hammers denote the relative amount of effort needed to implement the action. Hammers denote the relative amount of effort needed to implement the action. Hammers denote the relative amount of effort needed to implement the action.
    Dollar signs denote the relative cost of implementing the action.
    Free < $100
    $100-$500 $501-$2000
    > $2000
    Dollar signs denote the relative cost of implementing the action.
    Free < $100
    $100-$500 $501-$2000
    > $2000
    Dollar signs denote the relative cost of implementing the action.
    Free < $100
    $100-$500 $501-$2000
    > $2000
    Seal and insulate basement and/or crawlspace
    You need to be signed in to add and complete actions.
    Add to my challenge Already completed Not applicable

    Cold air can enter through gaps in poorly insulated basements and crawlspaces. The rim joist, where the foundation meets the wall of the first floor, is a common place for air exchange. There can also be penetration points for electrical wiring and pipes that run from the basement to other parts of the house that allow for air leakage. Sealing those penetrations and any gaps at the rim joist can greatly reduce the amount of air flow through these spaces. Learn more about sealing and insulating your basement or crawlspace from the ENERGY STAR® basement sealing guide.

    Project costs can vary, but utility bill savings and rebate programs can offset costs. Check out the Potomac Edison Home Performance with Energy Star program to learn how to get a 50% rebate up to $2,000 for insulation and air sealing projects.

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  • 10
    Green leaves denote the number of Green Points earned by completing the action and its relative environmental benefit.
    Hammers denote the relative amount of effort needed to implement the action. Hammers denote the relative amount of effort needed to implement the action. Hammers denote the relative amount of effort needed to implement the action.
    Dollar signs denote the relative cost of implementing the action.
    Free < $100
    $100-$500 $501-$2000
    > $2000
    Dollar signs denote the relative cost of implementing the action.
    Free < $100
    $100-$500 $501-$2000
    > $2000
    Dollar signs denote the relative cost of implementing the action.
    Free < $100
    $100-$500 $501-$2000
    > $2000
    Seal and insulate attic
    You need to be signed in to add and complete actions.
    Add to my challenge Already completed Not applicable

    If your home was built before 1991, your attic needs an insulation upgrade. Improving attic insulation can save up to 7% of your household’s energy consumption (5% on heating, and 2% on cooling). In some cases it can cut heating and cooling costs in half! It is a good idea to involve a professional for advice on recommended R-values and materials or installation. Properly sealing air leaks is an important component of a good insulation job, and improperly installed batts can sometimes do more harm than good! Learn more by reading the ENERGY STAR® sealing and insulating guide.

    Project costs can vary, but utility bill savings and rebate programs can offset costs. Check out the Potomac Edison Home Performance with Energy Star program to learn how to get a 50% rebate up to $2,000 for insulation and air sealing projects.

    To make your insulation project even greener, consider batt insulation made of 90% recycled cotton. This natural insulation meets the highest testing standards for fire and smoke ratings, fungi resistance, and corrosiveness, but is more expensive than fiberglass. Learn more about natural insulation options.

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  • 7
    Green leaves denote the number of Green Points earned by completing the action and its relative environmental benefit.
    Hammers denote the relative amount of effort needed to implement the action. Hammers denote the relative amount of effort needed to implement the action. Hammers denote the relative amount of effort needed to implement the action.
    Dollar signs denote the relative cost of implementing the action.
    Free < $100
    $100-$500 $501-$2000
    > $2000
    Dollar signs denote the relative cost of implementing the action.
    Free < $100
    $100-$500 $501-$2000
    > $2000
    Dollar signs denote the relative cost of implementing the action.
    Free < $100
    $100-$500 $501-$2000
    > $2000
    Insulate walls
    You need to be signed in to add and complete actions.
    Add to my challenge Already completed Not applicable

    Wall insulation is important to consider when you are looking at the exterior surface of your home. There are different options depending on how much insulation is needed and what kind for access you have to the walls. Loose-fill or sprayed foam insulation can be added without much alteration to finished walls. Batt insulation may be a better option if you are taking on a remodeling project. Some projects can be done on your own, or you may want to find a contractor if you have a large project or aren’t sure where to start.

    Project costs can vary, but utility bill savings and rebate programs can offset costs. Check out the Potomac Edison Home Performance with Energy Star program to learn how to get a 50% rebate up to $2,000 for insulation and air sealing projects.

    Learn more about wall insulation options from the Energy Savers guide or This Old House do-it-yourself guide.

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  • 7
    Green leaves denote the number of Green Points earned by completing the action and its relative environmental benefit.
    Hammers denote the relative amount of effort needed to implement the action. Hammers denote the relative amount of effort needed to implement the action. Hammers denote the relative amount of effort needed to implement the action.
    Dollar signs denote the relative cost of implementing the action.
    Free < $100
    $100-$500 $501-$2000
    > $2000
    Dollar signs denote the relative cost of implementing the action.
    Free < $100
    $100-$500 $501-$2000
    > $2000
    Dollar signs denote the relative cost of implementing the action.
    Free < $100
    $100-$500 $501-$2000
    > $2000
    Dollar signs denote the relative cost of implementing the action.
    Free < $100
    $100-$500 $501-$2000
    > $2000
    Install energy efficient windows
    You need to be signed in to add and complete actions.
    Add to my challenge Already completed Not applicable

    Before making a large financial investment in new windows, explore all options for increasing the energy efficiency of your existing windows, and overall home, with your home performance auditor or contractor. You may be able to achieve comparable or even greater energy savings for far less cost.

    If you do determine that you need to replace your windows, consider all aspects of a window: the frame, glass or glazing, and operation. There are many energy efficient options and performance measures to take into account: insulated double/triple glazing, Low-E (emissivity) coatings, air leakage rate, and more. Windows are rated using a variety of energy performance characteristics: U-factors, Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC), Sunlight transmittance, and more. Learn more about selecting energy efficient windows and check out these tips on window-related energy savings from EnergySavers.gov.

    Watch this video on the benefits of Low-E windows or this video that demos Low-E windows.

    HISTORIC CONSIDERATIONS: If you live in the City of Frederick’s Historic District, all window repairs and replacements must be approved by the Historic Preservation Commission. If your home has early or original windows, the Commission is likely to recommend repair or storm windows over replacement. If your property is on the National Register of Historic Places, read this Preservation Brief for more information about repairing and replacing historic windows.

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  • 1
    Green leaves denote the number of Green Points earned by completing the action and its relative environmental benefit.
    Hammers denote the relative amount of effort needed to implement the action.
    Dollar signs denote the relative cost of implementing the action.
    Free < $100
    $100-$500 $501-$2000
    > $2000
    A key denotes a renter-friendly action.
    Turn off lights in areas that are not being used
    You need to be signed in to add and complete actions.
    Add to my challenge Already completed Not applicable

    This is the simplest behavioral change that you and your family can make to your daily energy-saving regimen! Making a difference starts with small changes. Learn more about when to turn off your lights from EnergySavers.gov.

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