Use this page to find actions that your household has completed or plans to complete. Browse the categories on the left to find actions for the Power Saver, Green Leader, or Renewable Star Challenge.

Once you have signed in, you can click Add to My Challenge to add an action to your To Do List, Already Completed to mark an action as complete, or Not Applicable if the action does not apply to you.

Once signed in, you can rate each of the actions you have completed.
The highest rated action appear under the Most Popular Actions category.

ACTIONS

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    Green leaves denote the number of Green Points earned by completing the action and its relative environmental benefit.
    Hammers denote the relative amount of effort needed to implement the action.
    Dollar signs denote the relative cost of implementing the action.
    Free < $100
    $100-$500 $501-$2000
    > $2000
    A key denotes a renter-friendly action.
    Turn Off the TV When No One is Watching
    You need to be signed in to add and complete actions.
    Add to my challenge Already completed Not applicable

    Turning off the television when no one is watching or watching 25% less television in general can reduce your household energy use by 0.6% every year!

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  • 1
    Green leaves denote the number of Green Points earned by completing the action and its relative environmental benefit.
    Hammers denote the relative amount of effort needed to implement the action.
    Dollar signs denote the relative cost of implementing the action.
    Free < $100
    $100-$500 $501-$2000
    > $2000
    A key denotes a renter-friendly action.
    Turn off computer peripherals when not in use
    You need to be signed in to add and complete actions.
    Add to my challenge Already completed Not applicable

    Most likely, when you turn on your computer, your printer, scanner, and other peripherals come on too, even though you may only use these devices once or twice per week. Keep them turned off, and turn them on only when you need them, or use a smart power strip that turns them on and off automatically when you start up or shut down your computer!

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  • 3
    Green leaves denote the number of Green Points earned by completing the action and its relative environmental benefit.
    Hammers denote the relative amount of effort needed to implement the action. Hammers denote the relative amount of effort needed to implement the action.
    Dollar signs denote the relative cost of implementing the action.
    Free < $100
    $100-$500 $501-$2000
    > $2000
    A key denotes a renter-friendly action.
    Unplug power adapters and small electronics/appliances when not in use
    You need to be signed in to add and complete actions.
    Add to my challenge Already completed Not applicable

    Standby power, vampire power, and phantom loads refer to the electric power consumed by electronic appliances, such as VCRs, televisions, stereos, computers, and kitchen appliances, while they are switched off or in standby mode. A very common "electricity vampire" is a power adapter which has no power-off switch.

    Make sure to unplug your cell phone and reusable battery chargers from the outlet when not in use. These use energy even when not charging! You can also save energy by plugging electronics and appliances into power strips and turning them off when not in use.

    Studies at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have estimated that standby power may account for 5% to as much as 10% of total residential household power-consumption in the U.S. That adds up to that $3-6 billion in energy costs and is equivalent to the power generated by between 18 and 36 average power stations.

    Learn more about reducing vampire power from EnergySavers.gov.

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  • 4
    Green leaves denote the number of Green Points earned by completing the action and its relative environmental benefit.
    Hammers denote the relative amount of effort needed to implement the action. Hammers denote the relative amount of effort needed to implement the action.
    Dollar signs denote the relative cost of implementing the action.
    Free < $100
    $100-$500 $501-$2000
    > $2000
    A key denotes a renter-friendly action.
    Use clothes lines & racks to dry at least half of your laundry
    You need to be signed in to add and complete actions.
    Add to my challenge Already completed Not applicable

    Clothes dryers use 5-10% of a household’s daily energy use and are one of the most expensive home appliances to operate ($100-$200/year). They are also one of the most dangerous causing more than 15,000 home fires annually. If you would like to know how much energy and money it takes to launder your household’s clothes, try out this calculator.

    Instead, line-dry your clothes inside or outside. Explore clothesline and rack options on urbanclotheslines.com. If you think that your homeowner’s association or condominium prohibits the use of clotheslines, here’s some good news! Maryland’s “Right-to-Dry” legislation (SB 224) went into effect on October 1, 2010 and requires condominium associations, homeowner associations, and cooperatives to allow homeowners to install clotheslines on their property. Learn more about the benefits of air-drying clothes.

    TIP: Using hangers can really reduce the length of clothes line you need. (You’ll need a rod or taut wire for this approach). Use each hanger as a mini-clothes line for socks, dish towels, and the like. Install a rod over your washer dryer or use your shower rod for hangers during rainy or winter weather.

    If you have severe allergies to pollen, check the weather and the Air Quality Index before you hang your clothes outside.

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  • 2
    Green leaves denote the number of Green Points earned by completing the action and its relative environmental benefit.
    Hammers denote the relative amount of effort needed to implement the action. Hammers denote the relative amount of effort needed to implement the action.
    Dollar signs denote the relative cost of implementing the action.
    Free < $100
    $100-$500 $501-$2000
    > $2000
    A key denotes a renter-friendly action.
    Maintain your freezer and refrigerator
    You need to be signed in to add and complete actions.
    Add to my challenge Already completed Not applicable

    Test the seals on your refrigerator and freezer and replace them when needed. Warped or damaged gaskets on your refrigerator or freezer not only waste energy, they can lead to drips and mold. To test their effectiveness, place a dollar bill in the door and close. Gently tug it. If the dollar comes out easily, the gasket is not working properly, and you are losing energy and money. Learn more about how to replace your refrigerator gasket. Watch this fridge gasket replacement video or freezer gasket replacement video.

    Defrost your freezer when you notice that a layer of ice has built up. Frost can prevent the evaporator coils from cooling your food effectively and efficiently. To defrost, remove food from the freezer, turn off the freezer, and mop up ice as it melts. Alternatively, you can scrape ice out of the freezer.

    Keeping refrigerator coils clean can help you save money and avoid service calls. To clean the coils, first move the appliance away from the wall carefully and unplug it. Locate the coils - either on the back or at the front bottom of the fridge. If they're at the bottom, remove the grill in the front covering them and use a coil cleaning brush (available at hardware and appliance-parts store) to loosen the dirt; then remove it by vacuuming. You may also need to remove the back panel and clean it from the back. If the coils are on the back, clean them the same way. Do this at least twice a year (more often if you have pets) to help keep your refrigerator operating efficiently. Watch this coil cleaning video to learn more.

    Check out more fridge and freezer energy tips from the Consumer Energy Center.

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